4 Roots of Optimum Wellness

There are four essential parts to being healthy: Diet, Exercise, Sleep & Attitude.

Vitae Elixxir Healing Herbs

A proprietary combination of ten disease-fighting herbs used for more than 40 years and helping thousands of people with serious health issues.

The Prisoner of Carrot Castle Book App

Help your kids discover the fun of eating vegetables with the help of a whimsical interactive story (over 40,000 downloaded).

Books by Author & Health Coach Chris Pedersen

In a world of adventure and imagination, kids’ books in print and digital that encourage a healthy lifestyle.

6 Tips to Lose Weight

Don’t count calories—take a serious look at the food you want to eat, then ask, ”Is this something that will give my body good health?”

Friday, February 15, 2013

Tortilla Quinoa Salad with Cilantro Lime Dressing

We went to my brother's to watch the Super Bowl and I brought Tortilla Quinoa Salad with Cilantro Lime Dressing. I put it together with several modifications from the original recipe. But after eating it that Sunday, I made a few more changes and voilathe salad is perfect! My hubby brought the salad to his Tuesday meeting pot luck and it was a hit!

Tortilla Quinoa Salad w/Cilantro Lime Dressing

From Inspired by Cooking with Quinoa
Yield 6 - 8 servings

Category Salad
Cuisine Vegan

Ingredients
6 corn tortillas
olive oil spray
5 oz pkg organic spring mix
2 C cooked quinoa
1 15 oz can black beans, drained and rinsed
12-15 grape or cherry tomatoes, quartered
2-3 green onions, thinly sliced
1 avocado, pittted, peeled and diced
Dressing:
1/4 C fresh lime juice
1 Tbsp maple syrup
1/2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
1 clove garlic, minced
1 Tbsp finely chopped cilantro
1/4 C extra virgin olive oil
1/4 tsp sea salt

Directions
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cut tortillas in half and then into 1/4 inch strips. Place on baking sheet and spray with olive oil. Salt and pepper to taste. Bake about 10 minutes, turning half-way through.
2. In a large bowl, combine lettuce, quinoa, black beans, tomatoes, onions and avacado.
3. Prepare dressing by adding all ingredients into a small food processor or blender. Process until smooth.
4. Toss salad with dressing and top with tortilla strips.

If you don't have a small blender or food processor to make the dressing, you can use a whisk as long as the cilantro and garlic are finely chopped.

Try this salad and tell me what you think. Would you add jalapeno to this recipe?

Thursday, February 7, 2013

Genetic Roulette: A Must-See Movie

I watched the film Genetic Roulette this week and became even more concerned, even horrified, about the effects of genetically modified organisms (GMO) on the health of Americans and some unsuspecting countries.

The movie was released shortly before California citizens voted on the mandatory labeling of foods that contain GMO ingredients. When the proposition qualified for the November ballot as Prop 37, support for it ran about 70%. However, Monsanto and other organizations that created and benefit from GMOs entered the fray and contributed huge resources to defeat the measure. Opponents scared consumers into thinking food costs would increase measurably based on the assertion that re-labeling added too much cost to the manufacturers.

Wednesday, February 6, 2013

Wisdom Wednesday

Tip:
Have you made some changes in your diet this year that includes what you think are health foods? Take another look. Read the labels. You may find them not healthy at all. In fact, FAKE health food.

Friday, February 1, 2013

Einkorn Blender Pancakes

Have your been to the grocery store and found some new occupants in the bulk-bin aisle? Farro. Freekah. Einkorn. These ancient grains are enjoying a comeback (like heirloom tomatoes) as we rediscover their benefits and goodness. Read Get Your Freekah On for a treatise on the grains and seeds making a resurgence.

What is Einkorn?
Just happens to be man's first form of cultivated wheat, grown by farmers for thousands of years.

Why Einkorn?
Here's a quote from an article about the recently released study on wheat and weight gain:
"Wheat is not the same today. It has been agriculturally hybridized (not genetically engineered) over some decades to resist fungus, grow more quickly, and be more pliable for industrial bread baking. As a consequence, 50-60 years ago wheat containing only five percent gluten has become 50 percent gluten today." NaturalNews.com~Wednesday, January 16, 2013 by PF Louis
Gluten has been found to be the chief offender in gut and psychology syndrome (GAPS) and even autism as more studies show the gut strongly influences physical and mental health.

So the trend to find gut healthy grains led us back in history.