Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Cancer Alternatives Medicine Conference, March 2-4, 2017

When I first got my cancer diagnosis in 2008, I spent a lot of time researching and learning about my condition, the prognosis and cancer alternatives treatments. I discovered the Annie Appleseed Project, a non-profit organization that brings awareness to complementary and alternative treatments for cancer. Founder Ann Fonfa started the website as a resource for her own cancer treatment some 24 years ago since she found there was little information on the Internet about alternative and complementary treatments.
Annie Appleseed Project Mission Statement
The Annie Appleseed Project, a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation, provides information, education, advocacy, and awareness for people with cancer and their family and friends who are interested in complementary or alternative medicine (CAM) and natural therapies from a patient’s perspective.
The Annie Apple Seed project has grown to include an annual conference, now in its 11th year. Called the Complementary and Alternatives Medicine (CAM) Conference in West Palm Beach Florida, alternative cancer practitioners, patients, advocates and family can come to learn about new therapies and meet like-minded people. I always wanted to attend the conference and this past fall, Ann contacted me and asked if I would like to be on the Patient Panel on Saturday of the three-day conference. The CAM Conference begins Thursday, March 2 and runs through Saturday, March 4, 2016.

With a list of speakers addressing various natural cancer treatments, two of note are keynote speakers Linda Isaacs, MD and Michael Schachter, MD. Dr. Isaacs worked with Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez for 24 years and will discuss the protocols that she and Dr. Gonzalez worked on. Dr. Schachter will address the metabolic nature of cancer and what that means for treatment.

I'm most excited about meeting new friends on the journey and perhaps being a help for some who feel hopeless when their cancer is due to genetics. I am a great example that making healthy lifestyle changes can alter one's genetic disposition.

When I started my own journey, I made dramatic changes to my diet, and added several key supplements to my cancer fighting protocol. I did not know if what I was doing would have any affect toward stopping my body from producing cancerous polyps in my colon, but I knew I had to try. Today I know that what I do works and comes under what science calls epigenetics (genetics affected by your environment).

This is the message I want to bring to the Patient Panel at the conference. You are not a victim of your genetics. Taking action will save your life.
One of the coolest features of this conference, unlike any other that I know of, is the food. Organic, locally grown food will be served for a dinner gala on Thursday, lunch Friday and Saturday, and fresh juices and food in the morning and throughout the day. I am really looking forward to this conference.